Dexcom in the Elevator

What a morning.

Early Gym intensive? Check.

Dog leaving me 3 “traps” and my stepping in 1 as i stepped out of the shower?  Check.

A LOT of cursing at said dog? Check.

By the time I got into the elevator to go to work, I was saying, “Good Morning” through gritted teeth.  A full elevator.  I was frantically trying to pull down my dress which was caught on my overflowing laundry bag while still telling my dog he was in BIG trouble.  I was completely unaware that the older gentleman to my side was addressing me. I was more concerned with getting Bad Dog on his leash and my dirty laundry not falling around my feet.

The gentleman asked again, “Does that work with your cellphone?”.

Hmmmm?

My Dexcom sensor was right in his line of vision.  It’s at the beginning of week 2 and kind of a bedazzled mess (hey I take pride in my bedazzled Dexcom designs and this sensor has lost a few rhinestones along the way.  I know this because 2 came off in my second shower this morning… you know, the one AFTER I stepped in the dog trap).

dEXCOM ELEVATOR

I now had the attention of the other 2 people in the elevator as well.  I explained to the man that it’s a Continuous Glucose Monitor. Seeing the blank look on his face, I quickly added, it tells me my “blood sugar”.  Still blank.

“I’m diabetic”.

He quickly said he was sorry.  And that he didn’t mean to offend me.

We were out the door by this point and I was attempting to explain to him not to be sorry, but I was already losing the laundry bag, Bad Dog was attempting to pee on the front step (!!) and I was fairly certain my favorite, cozy summer dress was pulled-up and flashing my knickers to most of my street.

I kept thinking about it.  Was he sorry that I’m diabetic?  Dude, me too!  Well most of the time, me too.  No, he was sorry he asked about my cellphone that is inserted into my arm. Like he displayed bad manners or something.  I’m in a sleeveless dress.  I’ve got a weird looking sensor in my arm.  It’s decorated with multi-colored, multi-sized rhinestones.  I’m fairly certain this screams, “Ask me what’s on my arm”.  Or it screams, “I’m a girl who likes pink and bling and making stuff”.

I look forward to seeing my neighbor again.  I look forward to explaining to him a wee bit more about my Dexcom and how it’s a great way for me to talk about diabetes technology and why that’s important.  I then plan to speak into my arm and pretend I’m taking a call to my Mom.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Verio cupid

Happy Valentine’s Day! It’s a great day to tell all the people who’ve been your support network (I’m talking to you DOC), just how very much you love and appreciate them!  xo

Diabetes Notes… Part 1

Some diabetes thoughts:

1. Putting a Dexcom sensor in my arm, solo, is definitely doable.  Having gravity work to my advantage to release inserter… maybe not so much.  I watched the amazing Kim from www.textingmypancreas.com and she is so smooth (and bravery/awe inspiring).  Her Arm Dexcom Insertion video is awesome, but for some reason she has better gravity (the gravity in NYC may be broken, but I have not confirmed this).  I get the site inserted (woo hoo) but can’t get the inserter OFF MY DAMN ARM.  Mild panic then ensues (and hopping). I consider going downstairs, asking my doorman to pull the inserter off while I squeeze the sensor sides.  I then wonder which doorman is on duty.  I’m convinced it’ll be the same doorman who told me he was going to faint the time I tripped and came home with a bloody knee. THAT makes me laugh.  Yes, I’m sick in the head.  Doorman horrified and passed out while I greet my neighbors with that barbaric inserter protruding out of my tricep.

Here’s what I’ve realized…having a bra on the bathroom door knob is key.  I use it as a sling shot to release the inserter while I frantically squeeze the sensor.  This manuever may make me either McGuyver or a genius, or someone who needs to straighten up.

2. Speaking of straightening up, if you need to do some Spring cleaning (well in my case it’s more like Summer-Fall-Winter-Spring cleaning), donating your gently worn clothing to a charity, will make you feel good.  Donating to a store that supports diabetes research will make you feel EVEN better (it’s also extremely motivating).  NYers, check-out Cure Thrift Shop. Cool right?

3. Making jokes with fellow DOC friends on Twitter about Dexcom adhesion battles, really will lighten your mood.  It also MAY turn a hassle… into an art project!

Floral Sparkle Dexcom? Yep!